Paying For College: Understanding Scholarships, Grants and Loans

Paying For College: Understanding Scholarships, Grants and Loans

A college education remains the most reliable path to gainful employment — but paying for it can be a struggle. Thankfully, there are a variety of options for covering tuition, books, and other necessary expenses. As explained in the below financial aid breakdown guide by Carrington.edu, common options include scholarships, grants and loans. Which is best for your situation? Keep reading to find out. Scholarships Often merit-based, scholarships are offered by a variety of schools and organizations. They may range from a few hundred to tens of thousands of dollars. No repayment is necessary, making them a desirable option for students who wish to avoid debt. Grants Grants are similar to scholarships in that they do not have to be repaid, but eligibility is generally based on need, rather than merit. Typically, grants are offered by the federal government, state government, or the institution the student wishes to attend. College Loans There are federal and private student loans. Open to the greatest range of students, college loans must eventually be paid back with interest. Some graduates are granted forgiveness for federal student loans in exchange for entering public service positions. Many students cover tuition with a combination of loans, grants, and scholarships. Think carefully as you determine which approach will provide the greatest long-term payoff. This post and infographic was provided courtesy of Carrington...
How Many Transfer Students Get In?  2015 Transfer Rates at America’s Top Colleges

How Many Transfer Students Get In? 2015 Transfer Rates at America’s Top Colleges

    Want to know your chances of getting into your top choice college? Find out here. It is hard enough to get into top colleges as it is, but when you are looking to transfer, it is unfortunately even harder. Some schools only accept a small handful of students each year with acceptance rates under 1%, more competitive than any freshmen pool. And while I encourage applying to the school of your dreams even when it is a long shot, it is good to round out your list with schools that have plenty of open spots. Luckily there are some great schools that have hundreds or even thousands of spots available each year. Here is a list of many of the top colleges in the United States and the number of spots they opened up to transfer students entering in the fall of 2015. While these numbers change from year to year, this list will provide you a good starting point for determining which schools offer you the best shot of transfer admission.   Alabama   University of Alabama Transfer students applying: 4,926 Students accepted: 2,770 Transfer Acceptance Rate: 56%   Alaska   University of Alaska – Fairbanks Transfer students applying: 841 Students accepted: 711 Transfer Acceptance Rate: 84.5%   Arizona   Arizona State University – Tempe Transfer students applying: 7,428 Students accepted: 5,887 Transfer Acceptance Rate: 79%   University of Arizona Transfer students applying: 5,109 Students accepted: 3,628 Transfer Acceptance Rate: 71%   Arkansas   Hendrix College Transfer students applying: 61 Students accepted: 25 Transfer Acceptance Rate: 41%   University of Arkansas Transfer students applying: 3,755 Students...
The Secret Ingredient For Improving Your SAT and ACT Scores

The Secret Ingredient For Improving Your SAT and ACT Scores

Want to know your chances? Find out here. I have a secret. The SAT and ACT is not a test of natural born intelligence. It is just a test, like any other test, that anyone can ace with enough practice. And yes, that includes you. It doesn’t matter if English isn’t your first language. It doesn’t matter if you only have a few weeks before you have to take the test. It doesn’t matter if you scored hundreds of points below your target score. You can do it. How, you ask? Practice. I know that sounds too good to be true, but it is. Think about it. When you have a math test at school, what do you do? You study. You go through all the practice problems you can get your hands on. And then you do it again and again and again until it becomes second nature. The SAT and ACT are long tests, but the same principles apply. Like a math test in school, they are testing for specific types of knowledge and thinking, and they rely on the same types of questions and techniques over and over and over again. What You Need to Do If you want to ace one of these tests, the secret is to know them inside and out. And the best way to do that is to take as many practice tests as you can. There are hundreds of them out there. Sit down at home with a timer and take the entire thing, just like you would on the day of the real test. Give yourself the same amount...
High School Juniors: Don’t Take the Old SAT

High School Juniors: Don’t Take the Old SAT

The SAT is changing. Lots of high school juniors are nervous. Should I take the old SAT now and get it out of the way? How will I be able to study for a test that hasn’t yet been administered? Is this new test going to hurt my chance of admission? I’ve been getting a lot of these questions from high school juniors. And I get it. It is scary to be the transition class. But here is my advice: don’t worry about it. Take the new SAT or the ACT, but don’t feel as if you have to cram in the old SAT and get your dream score before the test switches over. Putting that pressure on yourself is unnecessary and counterproductive. I graduated from high school in 2006. I too was in the transition class when during the second half of my junior year in 2005, the College Board first introduced the test they are now getting rid of. It was a scary time then, I remember. We didn’t know what to expect. People were afraid that college wouldn’t know how to interpret the new scores or that we would all test poorly because it would be difficult to study for an unknown test. But honestly, things worked out fine, and in retrospect, the panic was overblown. Here’s what happened to my friends who tried to take the “old SAT” before the test switched over: 1.     They were very stressed out studying during the middle of junior year. 2.     They were almost all dissatisfied with their scores. 3.     They decided to take the test again when the...
$4,000 Scholarship for Aspiring Writers

$4,000 Scholarship for Aspiring Writers

What Major Best Fits Your Personality? Find out here.   Calling all writers!   Check out this new scholarship for aspiring writers. Unlike many scholarships, it is easy and fast to apply, and you can use the money to help pay for college directly or to help you with some of the side expenses like buying a new computer. All you need to do is submit a short story, poem, blog post, or other piece of writing by November, 29, 2015, and you could win $4,000. See details below and apply here!...